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​📰​ ARTICLE: A Comprehensive Guide to over 50 Types of American Visas


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The United States, a land of diverse opportunities, attracts individuals from around the world for various purposes, be it work, study, or leisure. Navigating the American visa landscape can be intricate, given the array of visa types designed to accommodate different needs. In this comprehensive guide, we'll explore various American visas, categorizing them based on their primary purposes.

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1-10: Work Visas:

1. H-1B Visa:

  • Designed for highly skilled workers in specialty occupations.

2. L-1 Visa:

  • Allows intracompany transferees to work in a U.S. branch.

3. O-1 Visa:

  • For individuals with extraordinary abilities or achievements.

4. E-3 Visa:

  • Exclusive to Australian professionals in specialty occupations.

5. J-1 Visa:

  • Facilitates cultural exchange programs, including work and study opportunities.

6. TN Visa:

  • For professionals from Canada and Mexico under NAFTA.

7. EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program:

  • Grants a green card to investors contributing to job creation.

8. OPT (Optional Practical Training):

  • Allows international students to work in their field of study.

9. H-2B Visa:

  • For temporary non-agricultural workers.

10. E-2 Treaty Investor Visa:

  • For individuals from treaty countries making substantial investments.
    
 

11-20: Study and Exchange Visas:

11. F-1 Visa:

  • For international students enrolled in academic programs.

12. M-1 Visa:

  • Designed for vocational and non-academic studies.

13. J-1 Visa (Exchange Visitor):

  • Enables cultural exchange programs, including work and study.

14. Q-1 Visa (Cultural Exchange):

  • For participants in international cultural exchange programs.

15. U Visa (Victims of Crime):

  • For victims of certain crimes, offering protection and work eligibility.

16. R-1 Visa (Religious Worker):

  • Facilitates religious workers' entry to the U.S.

17. K-1 Visa (Fiancé(e) of U.S. Citizen):

  • Allows foreign fiancé(e)s to enter the U.S. for marriage.

18. S Visa (Witnesses and Informants):

  • For witnesses or informants in criminal cases.

19. A-2 Visa (Foreign Government Employees):

  • For employees of foreign governments entering the U.S.

20. NATO Visas:

  • Various visas for representatives of NATO member countries.
    
 

21-30: Family-Based Immigrant Visas:

21. IR-1/CR-1 Visa (Spouse of a U.S. Citizen):

  • For spouses of U.S. citizens.

22. F-2A Visa (Spouse or Minor Child of a Green Card Holder):

  • For spouses and unmarried children under 21 of green card holders.

23. F-2B Visa (Unmarried Adult Children of a Green Card Holder):

  • For unmarried children over 21 of green card holders.

24. F-3 Visa (Married Adult Children of U.S. Citizens):

  • For married children of U.S. citizens.

25. F-4 Visa (Brothers and Sisters of Adult U.S. Citizens):

  • For siblings of U.S. citizens.

26. K Visas (For Fiancé(e)s and Children):

  • K-1 for fiancé(e)s and K-2 for their children.

27. V Visa (Spouses and Children of Legal Permanent Residents):

  • Allows family reunification while waiting for green card processing.

28. U Visa (Victims of Crime):

  • For victims of certain crimes, offering protection and work eligibility.

29. Special Immigrant Juvenile Visa (SIJ):

  • For children who have been abused, neglected, or abandoned.

30. VAWA Visas (Violence Against Women Act):

  • For victims of domestic violence.

31. B-2 Visa: Tourism and Pleasure:

  • The B-2 visa is designed for individuals traveling to the U.S. for tourism, pleasure, or visiting friends and relatives

 

32-41: Humanitarian Visas:

32. Asylum and Refugee Status:

  • For those fleeing persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution.

33. T Visa (Victims of Human Trafficking):

  • For victims of human trafficking.

34. U Visa (Victims of Crime):

  • For victims of certain crimes, offering protection and work eligibility.

35. Temporary Protected Status (TPS):

  • Provides temporary refuge for individuals from certain countries facing crises.

36. I Visa (Journalists and Media):

  • For representatives of foreign media.

37. G Visa (International Organization Representatives):

  • For representatives of international organizations.

38 N Visa (Children of Certain Special Immigrants):

  • For children of certain special immigrants.

39. H-4 Visa:

  • For dependents of H visa holders.

40. L-2 Visa:

  • For dependents of L visa holders.

41. O-3 Visa:

  • For dependents of O visa holders.
 

42-52: Other Nonimmigrant Visas:

42. B-1 Visa: Business Visitors:

  • The B-1 visa is tailored for individuals traveling to the U.S. for business purposes.

43. C Visa (Transit Visa):

  • For individuals traveling through the U.S. to another country.

44. D Visa (Crewmembers):

  • For individuals serving in a capacity essential to the vessel's operation.

45. I Visa (Representatives of Foreign Media):

  • For representatives of foreign media.

46. K Visa (Fiancé(e) of U.S. Citizen):

  • Allows foreign fiancé(e)s to enter the U.S. for marriage.

47. P Visas (Athletes, Artists, and Entertainers):

  • P-1 for athletes and entertainers, P-2 for artists and entertainers in reciprocal exchange programs, P-3 for culturally unique artists and entertainers.

48. Q Visa (International Cultural Exchange):

  • For participants in international cultural exchange programs.

49. R-1 Visa (Religious Worker):

  • Facilitates religious workers' entry to the U.S.

50. S Visa (Witnesses and Informants):

  • For witnesses or informants in criminal cases.

51. T Visa (Victims of Human Trafficking):

  • For victims of human trafficking.

52. V Visa (Spouses and Children of Legal Permanent Residents):

  • Allows family reunification while waiting for green card processing.
    

work-visa-passport.png?_cb=1705028647

This comprehensive guide offers an overview of the diverse American visa landscape. It's essential to note that visa policies and categories may change, so it's advisable to consult with official U.S. immigration sources for the most up-to-date information.


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